Shield-X ‘cap’ takes helmet performance to the next level

The SFU researchers behind Shield-X Technology have developed a new product that can be worn under virtually any helmet to significantly enhance its performance.

BX-C is a thin cap made of Shield-X membrane. When worn under a helmet, the patented, wearable technology acts as a “convenient armour” against the sharp twisting of the brain.

“We’ve engineered BX-C to be thin and breathable,” says SFU researcher Daniel Abram, CTO of Shield-X Technology. The company’s initial product (BX-E) is a thin, patch that adheres to helmets. Researchers later developed an invisible enhancement that is added directly to the inside liner without restructuring the helmet, primarily targeting cycling (BX-I).

The latest product, BX-C, is a separate enhancement that fits snuggly underneath any helmet, from hockey to cycling. Abram says BX-C is designed to be durable, reusable and machine washable.

Concussions are one of sports’ biggest challenges, and Abram notes that modern helmets “continue to have a massive blind spot” in rotational forces.

“During impact, rotational forces play a key role in causing head injuries and concussions,” says Abram. “Shield-X has created a modular, multi-purpose technology to mitigate these harmful forces.”

The BX-C cap is made of Shield-X membrane that has been rigorously tested by Shield-X Technology and other independent testing facilities in Canada and the U.S.

Abram says the tech company is looking to collaborate with a sport-wear company to make the technology available to the athletes. 

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Abram notes there are many factors that relate to concussion and head injury and protective equipment is only one of these. Age, weight, a player's strength, location and direction of impact, whether or not it was anticipated, and previous head trauma are also contributing factors.

Earlier this spring Abram was selected by MITACS as one of Canada’s “next 150” researchers “whose dedication and vision have impacted our past and will inspire our future.”

EARLIER STORIES:

www.sfu.ca/sfunews/stories/2017/study-finds-31-per-cent-concussion-drop-with-shield-x-decal-use-.html

www.sfu.ca/sfunews/stories/2015/brainshield-to-enhance-football-helmets-effectiveness.html